How to Start and Enable Firewalld on CentOS 7

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In this article, we discuss how to start and enable firewalld. It is highly recommended that you have a firewall protecting your server.
Pre-Flight Check
  • These instructions are intended specifically for enabling and starting Firewalld CentOS 7.
  • I’ll be working from a Liquid Web Self Managed CentOS 7 server, and I’ll be logged in as root.

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Top 5 Reasons To Use CentOS 7

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When you’re considering which Operating System to use for web hosting, there are many options available to you. We’re going to discuss 5 reasons you should choose CentOS 7 and the strengths of the platform. CentOS has been the preferred Linux distribution in the hosting industry for many years, and it was only recently that this distro was overtaken by Ubuntu Server as the primary OS used for web hosting.

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Install Puppet on Ubuntu 18.04

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What is Puppet?

In this tutorial, we will install Puppet on a Ubuntu 18.04 server. Puppet is an open core, server based, task management type of automation software that is primarily used to limit your interactions for many of the mundane, day to day server tasks that used to require personal intervention. 

This software allows you as the server owner to delegate specific functions to the software, thereby freeing you up for more critical business efforts. Puppet is a master/client based system that can interact with both Windows and Linux servers. The Puppet master server is run from a Linux server (a small downside given the time and effort it will save in the long run) but, can control efforts on other server types as well.
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Installing cPanel/WHM On CentOS 6 & 7

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What is cPanel? 

cPanel is a server control panel which allows users the ability to access and automate server tasks and, provides the tools needed to manage the overall server, their applications, and websites.  CPanel_logoSome features include the capability to modify php versions, creating individual cPanel accounts, adding FTP users, installing SSL’s, configuring security settings, and installing packages to name a few. cPanel and WHM have a vast range of customizations and configurations that can be completed to further personalize your platform specifically for your needs.  It also includes 24/7 support from cPanel as well.

When purchasing a server from Liquid Web, we offer several images your server can be built from.  We offer these images on most of our hosting products, including, dedicated servers, cloud dedicated servers, and our VPS offerings.  Another bonus is that cPanel is supported out of the box on our fully managed servers. Our staff is well versed in providing assistance as well.  Our automated install process will install and setup cPanel on your server. If you happen to have a cPanel license or are utilizing cPanel’s free trial, then please continue reading as we will be discussing how to install and setup cPanel on a CentOS 6 or 7 Linux box.  

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How to Configure Apache Virtual Hosts on CentOS 7

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Today, we will be reviewing how to configure Apache virtual hosts on a CentOS 7 server. If you host websites, chances are you are hosting more than one website. If so, knowing how and why these virtual hosts work should allow you to better understand why they are needed.
By default, Apache can host only one document root for all requests, which likely isn’t what you want to happen.

We can use VirtualHost blocks to translate named domains into their appropriate document roots, with new settings per-block as needed. But, what goes into a valid VirtualHost? Where should it be stored?

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Why Choose CentOS 6 or 7

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Introduction

The servers that run our applications, our businesses, all depend on the stability and underlying features offered by the operating system (or OS) installed. As administrators, we have to plan ahead and think to the future of how our users will use the machines we oversee while simultaneously ensuring that those machines remain stable and online. There are numerous operating systems to choose from; however one of the most popular, most stable, and highly supported OSes is CentOS. A combination of excellent features, rock-solid performance stability, and the backing of enterprise-focused institutions such as Red Hat and Fedora have led to CentOS becoming a mainstay OS that administrators can count on.

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How To List Users in CentOS 7

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Adding a user in CentOS is a common task for most Linux admins. User’s have unique username’s and occassionally you may wonder if a username is in use or need other details about the user (like their group ID). We’ll show you how to see a list of users by logging into your Liquid Web CentOS 7 server. Once you’ve logged in via SSH, you’ll be able to run the commands below and get the information you need. Let’s get started!

To get a simple list of user names, enter the command below and press Enter.

getent passwd | cut -d: -f1

This command gives us a list of users assigned to this CentOS server. If you’d like a more detailed list of user you can use the command below. Using the command will provide you with the username, UID, GID, User Details, their home directory path, and the Default Shell for the user.

getent passwd

Example Output:

In our example you’ll see each field is separated by colons. Let’s breakdown the sections to provide more information on the user.

  • Username-the user example is root. Other users include bin, daemon, systemd-network, among many others. These are for when these entities need to access the system.
  • Password-indicated by the letter x, you can also find this encrypted password in the /etc/shadow file.
  • UID-this is the user’s ID, indicated by number starting at 1000. The root user is special as its UID is 0.
  • GID-like the user ID, the group ID shows us the the group that a user belongs to. The GID also starts at 1000 and for root user the group number is 0.
  • User Details – usually you’ll find the user’s first name. Sometimes this field can also be left blank.
  • Home Directory- this is the path that a user is in when logging into the server. You can alter this path by chrooting a user’s path.
  • Default Shell- A shell allows for an environment where users interact with the server and the type of shell assigned allows for different usage. The /bin/bash shell allows for text files to run commands.

How to Replace MySQL with Percona on Plesk CentOS 7

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This article outlines the procedure for replacing the native MySQL®️ or MariaDB®️ service that is preinstalled on any typical Plesk Onyx 11 CentOS 7 server. The procedure outlines removal of the existing MySQL related binaries and replaces them with an adequate version of the Percona binaries. Once these Percona binaries are in place, a typical multistage MySQL Incremental version upgrade is processed to bring the existing databases and Percona binaries to the desired Percona 5.7 version. Continue reading “How to Replace MySQL with Percona on Plesk CentOS 7”

Install Java 8 on CentOS 7

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In this tutorial, we’ll be showing you how to install Oracle’s Java 8 programming language specifically onto a CentOS 7 server. This simple object-oriented language is used for many of the applications and websites you come across today.  Let’s jump right in!

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